Life in Freetown

 by Linda Jenkins, KSLP Nurse Educator

 

 

I came to Freetown in August 2016 hoping to use my training skills and nursing/midwifery knowledge to work with partners at the faculty of nursing but wasn’t at all sure what the role entailed as I was this was the first KSLP volunteer post in nurse education. Joining a team of skilled medical volunteers seemed daunting at first, but the sense of camaraderie and fun was good as we adjusted to conditions and challenges but also enjoyed the benefits of Salone life (beaches, bars and fresh fish & seafood). I found common ground with some of the nurses who had worked through the Ebola epidemic which helped us create a voice for nursing amongst the medics and researchers!

Linda Blog Banner

It is strange for me to feel that though it’s been many years since I worked in West Africa (I spent three years in a village in Burkina and two in The Gambia) some things are still the same – the heat; the noise; the colours; the music; the pace of life. The welcome for us all is big here although the country has suffered a great deal. Before I arrived, I had some insights through listening to my partner who has spent many years working with Sierra Leone Red Cross and from my daughter who spent time here too. My colleagues at the faculty of nursing are inventive when dealing with the challenges that face them – poor conditions in offices and classrooms; no electricity or water and plenty of students. They accepted me as a partner and I enjoyed getting to know them as friends too. I feel having experience of living in Africa helped me and them to communicate and build relationships, which is the core to partnership working. There are naturally challenges for me and for them. For me it’s taking time to understand and see how things work. It’s never time wasted. For them it’s understanding that Kings doesn’t always bring money but offers skills and connections.

There is no doubt the role that Kings played during Ebola created a positive attitude towards Kings volunteers and this helps forge relationships. I’ve both enjoyed and been frustrated when working here but possibly no more than in my previous NHS role! The work on the curriculum development, sharing the frustrations of the nursing lecturers, meeting the students and invigilating at exams are all highlights of my working time here. The beaches, developing a suntan and being able to work near my partner were highlights of my home life here. There are plenty of outlets for activities outside work like beach walks, (watching) running, swimming, bars and a large international church group to be involved with. As anywhere in low resource countries, it’s getting your head around the obvious contrasts in contexts of poverty and the rural/urban split that is hard. Despite this, the experience is huge and rewarding.

We are currently looking for a new Nurse Educator to replace Linda as she moves onto pastures new – please check our Volunteer page for more details. To apply, please submit a covering letter (maximum 2 pages) and CV (maximum 4 pages) to volunteer@kslp.org.uk before midnight on Sunday 24th September.

Designing a Development Programme for the Faculty of Nursing Lecturers

The King’s Sierra Leone Partnership is moving into an exciting phase with our partners at the Faculty of Nursing at the College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences (COMAHS), University of Sierra Leone.

On 3rd November 2016, Sister Alicia Wilson-Taylor, Senior Nurse Lecturer at COMAHS, and Dr Matthew Vandy, Dean of the Faculty, co-led an interactive workshop with the support of Linda Jenkins, KSLP’s Nurse Educator. The workshop built on teaching sessions started with COMAHS in 2013/14, before the Ebola outbreak halted this work, and outlined current plans to design a development programme for the faculty of nursing lecturers.

kslp-and-faculty-of-nursing-at-comahs-photo-2

Topics of discussion included developing skills in carrying out teaching observations, peer evaluation of teaching, student assessment, ward teaching, research, and the use of IT. The session was attended by 8 of the faculty lecturers.

Sister Wilson-Taylor shared with the group an inspiring example of using interactive learning in a teaching session the previous day where students had been asked to work in pairs to define the characteristics of a nurse and feedback to the group. Sister Wilson-Taylor said the session had been very successful and that the students came up with great ideas and the team is looking forward to future sessions.

kslp-and-faculty-of-nursing-at-comahs-photo-1 Dr Vandy, Sister Wilson-Taylor, and colleagues will be working over the next 10 months, supported by Linda, to develop the nursing curriculum, teaching, and assessment methods and use the learning from similar work that has already taken place in the Faculty of Medicine, also supported by KSLP’s Education Manager Suzanne Thomas.

IPC Campaign Week

As part of our ongoing work with the Infection Prevention & Control (IPC) Programme, KSLP IPC nurse mentors have been supporting partners at Connaught, Lumley and King Harman Road Hospitals to implement regular IPC campaign weeks. These weeks have proven effective in building and maintaining enthusiasm among hospital staff about the importance of following IPC protocols.

dsc01982
Hand washing during one of Connaught’s IPC weeks in May

Each IPC week is different, but typically each day of the week has a particular theme for which the IPC Focal Person collaborates with the link nurses to focus the day’s training and monitoring on one particular component of IPC.

dsc_0317
Bobson Fofanah explaining the correct disposal of sharps

For instance, this September featured Sharps Safety Day at King Harman Road Hospital. Assistant IPC Focal Person Bobson Fofanah visited each ward to ensure that sharps bins were assembled correctly and located in safe places in each ward. He also checked to see if there are instructional posters in place and to make sure every staff member is aware of the importance of proper sharps disposal.

IPC campaign weeks build a strong sense of teamwork and enthusiasm about IPC across the hospitals. The week ends with a celebration, with awards given to the wards showing improvement in IPC practices.

IPC weeks also give the team opportunities to show off their creativity!

King Harman Road Nurses sing the IPC Song from King’s Sierra Leone Partnership on Vimeo.