Life in Freetown

 by Linda Jenkins, KSLP Nurse Educator

 

 

I came to Freetown in August 2016 hoping to use my training skills and nursing/midwifery knowledge to work with partners at the faculty of nursing but wasn’t at all sure what the role entailed as I was this was the first KSLP volunteer post in nurse education. Joining a team of skilled medical volunteers seemed daunting at first, but the sense of camaraderie and fun was good as we adjusted to conditions and challenges but also enjoyed the benefits of Salone life (beaches, bars and fresh fish & seafood). I found common ground with some of the nurses who had worked through the Ebola epidemic which helped us create a voice for nursing amongst the medics and researchers!

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It is strange for me to feel that though it’s been many years since I worked in West Africa (I spent three years in a village in Burkina and two in The Gambia) some things are still the same – the heat; the noise; the colours; the music; the pace of life. The welcome for us all is big here although the country has suffered a great deal. Before I arrived, I had some insights through listening to my partner who has spent many years working with Sierra Leone Red Cross and from my daughter who spent time here too. My colleagues at the faculty of nursing are inventive when dealing with the challenges that face them – poor conditions in offices and classrooms; no electricity or water and plenty of students. They accepted me as a partner and I enjoyed getting to know them as friends too. I feel having experience of living in Africa helped me and them to communicate and build relationships, which is the core to partnership working. There are naturally challenges for me and for them. For me it’s taking time to understand and see how things work. It’s never time wasted. For them it’s understanding that Kings doesn’t always bring money but offers skills and connections.

There is no doubt the role that Kings played during Ebola created a positive attitude towards Kings volunteers and this helps forge relationships. I’ve both enjoyed and been frustrated when working here but possibly no more than in my previous NHS role! The work on the curriculum development, sharing the frustrations of the nursing lecturers, meeting the students and invigilating at exams are all highlights of my working time here. The beaches, developing a suntan and being able to work near my partner were highlights of my home life here. There are plenty of outlets for activities outside work like beach walks, (watching) running, swimming, bars and a large international church group to be involved with. As anywhere in low resource countries, it’s getting your head around the obvious contrasts in contexts of poverty and the rural/urban split that is hard. Despite this, the experience is huge and rewarding.

We are currently looking for a new Nurse Educator to replace Linda as she moves onto pastures new – please check our Volunteer page for more details. To apply, please submit a covering letter (maximum 2 pages) and CV (maximum 4 pages) to volunteer@kslp.org.uk before midnight on Sunday 24th September.